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See You in the Humorous Papers – Exhibit & Etymology The Daily Cartoonist

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Residence / Area: Animation

See You in the Funny Papers – Show & Etymology

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“See You in the Funny Papers”: a phrase that started to grace the American lexicon about the 1920s and served as a reminder that existence can frequently be just as amusing and whimsical as the Sunday comics.

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Which is what Ruthmere’s summer time exhibit is all about…

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Amusing Papers will involve a touring exhibit from the Charles M. Schulz Museum called Pigskin Peanuts, featuring delightfully nostalgic “Peanuts” comics about just one of America’s favourite pastimes: football. From July 1st -July 28th only, the exhibit will also include Pencils to Pixels: Hoosier Cartoons and Comics, yet another show mortgage from the Indiana Historical Modern society

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Other exhibit parts guarantee to make Funny Papers an unforgettable stroll down memory lane. Some of these consist of: “Garfield,” “Tumbleweeds,” and “Roger Bean” memorabilia from Minnetrista in Muncie, IN “Brenda Starr” comics from the Porter County Museum in Valparaiso, IN animation cels and initial artwork from the Corridor of Heroes Superhero Museum in Elkhart and resources of neighborhood comedian artists, these types of as Max Gwin and Monthly bill Holman, from the Nappenee Public Library in Nappanee, IN.

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So if you are in the Chicago, illinois – Grand Rapids/Lansing, Michigan – Fort Wayne, Indiana area this summer time fall by The Ruthmere in Elkhart.

 

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“See You in the Amusing Papers”: a phrase that began to grace the American lexicon all over the 1920s…

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I, the natural way, took that as a obstacle to uncover the phrase utilised before than the 1920s. Most men and women seem to get the origins of the expression from a 2011 Term Detective account:

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“See you in the funny papers” nearly certainly dates back to the early 1920s simply because the time period “funny papers/webpages/sheet” alone apparently did not look in print right until around that time. A glossary of humor released in 1926 involved “See you in the amusing sheet,” and William Faulkner also applied the phrase in his 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury (“Ta-ta see you in the funnypaper”), so it should have been common by that time.

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By way of newspapers.com I found “Bye Bye, I’ll see you in the funny papers.” in a January 13, 1915 version of The Hutchinson (Kansas) News. This is the earliest I located.

In complete context, for what it’s worth:

4 decades afterwards in an April 18, 1919 edition of the College Day-to-day Kansan (University of Kansas)
it is identified as a filler proclaiming it a famed idiom:

 

In 1918 (November 22) it is discovered in the Kincaid (Kansas) Significant School Tattler (previously mentioned)
and in a soldier’s letter released in The Natoma (Kansas) Unbiased on Might 22, 1919.

The only other pre-1920 time I located was in the June 6, 1919 Leavenworth New Period:

 

Curiously every 1 of these 19teenagers resources are from Kansas.
So did the phrase originate in that point out?

 

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